Assistive technology

Assistive technology is the modification of an existing technology or the creation of a new one giving access to everyone, despite any disability, to carry out day to day activities.

Who is assistive technology for?

Assistive technology is aimed at these groups of people:

  • Visually impaired
  • Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD)
  • Mobility impaired
  • Deaf or hard of hearing
  • Restricted ability or inability to use standard keyboard or mouse

Computers and software on campus

The University has various assistive technology to enable disabled students to carry out their studies and achieve their academic goals. All PCs available to students on campus have a range of assistive technology software, most of which is available to all students.

The following assistive technology software is available in the computer clusters to all students:

  • TextHelp Read&Write (screen-reading and overlays etc.)
  • Mindjet MindManager (mind-mapping software)

Additionally, the following assistive technology software is available in the computer clusters to students registered with the Disability and Learning Support Service (ask your keyworker to add you to the user group):

  • Jaws (screen-reader)
  • ZoomText (magnifier and reader)

Students registered with the Disability and Learning Support Service who have specific needs may also be registered to use our four Assistive Technology booths in the Main Library. Ask your keyworker about being added to the AT booth list. The booths have the following equipment:

  • Matte screen
  • Optical disc drive
  • High contrast keyboard
  • Standard mouse
  • Trackball or ergonomic mouse
  • Headset with microphone
  • Dragon Naturally Speaking (speech recognition software)
  • ClaroRead
  • Pearl Scanner with Open Book
  • Viewplus Spot Dot Emprint Braille embosser
  • Dolphin EasyConverter

Mobile learning devices study

Mobile learning devices, for example iPads and other tablets, are being widely used in all educational fields. Research was undertaken to evaluate if tablets have particular qualities to assist disabled students in their studies. This report details the findings: