Degree Apprenticeship Delivery Models

 

Here are some examples of potential models for the development and delivery of Degree Apprenticeships. This is not an exhaustive list, but covers the most likely scenarios we will encounter.

Model A1

Integrated DA where the University provides the total learning content (minimum variation to current curriculum). Non-term time is spent with the employer. This works well with both Undergraduate and Postgraduate programmes.

Model A2

Non-integrated DA where the University provides the total learning content (minimum variation to current curriculum) of the degree programme but the student is required to complete an End-Point Assessment with an additional education provider. Non-term time is spent with the employer.

Model B1

Integrated DA where the University works with the employer to develop a bespoke programme and modules with flexible delivery times/modes, e.g. day release, short intensive modules, Distance Learning. This might work best as PG level.

Model B2

Non-integrated DA where the University works with the employer to develop a bespoke programme and modules with flexible delivery times/modes, e.g. day release, short intensive modules, Distance Learning. End-Point Assessment is provided by a third party. This might work best as PG level.

Model C

Integrated or Non-integrated DA where the University works with an employer and Further Education provider to develop a bespoke programme and modules with flexible delivery times/modes, e.g. day release, short intensive modules, Distance Learning. The FE provider will deliver below Degree level and arrangements will be in place to allow students to progress to Degree level programme at UoB.

 

Academic Input

When it comes to developing Degree Apprenticeships in the College, there are four areas where academic engagement will be key. These are:

  • Curriculum mapping – this is the process of mapping existing modules that are delivered in the College to specific Degree Apprenticeship standards, in order to determine whether we are satisfied that all the required knowledge, skills and behaviours will be met through the programme we offer. I will support this activity as it is a key component to our approval process, and your subject knowledge and expertise will be vital to completing this exercise.
  • Developing the programme – this is the stage where the content and mode of delivery of the programme is determined. It may be in done in partnership with a business or external organisation, so will likely involved some collaborative meetings to ensure the programme both meets our requirements as a University, and the business needs of the employer.
  • Marketing – as we begin to develop some Degree Apprenticeship programmes, we will need to market them to levy-paying employers. Some of these discussions may begin before a programme is fully developed. Your subject knowledge and expertise will be crucial when engaging with employers to market our programmes to them.
  • Delivery – once the Degree Apprenticeship is up and running, we will likely have several employers who we are contracted to for its delivery. As such, there is an element of ongoing relationship management throughout the delivery of the Degree Apprenticeship programme which the academic programme lead will need to be involved with.