Your Wellbeing

CoSS Wellbeing

The College Wellbeing Team offers a confidential and non-judgmental service. We can support you with anything from concerns about managing your workload or issues with housemates through to bereavements or mental health concerns; no problem is too big or too small. We can also help you to access some of the University’s processes that are designed to support you through any challenges you face during your studies.

College of Social Sciences Student Wellbeing

Meet your Wellbeing Team!

Vickie Glynn

Vickie Glynn

Student Experience and Wellbeing Manager (Wellbeing)

“Hi, my name is Vickie and I’m responsible for the College Wellbeing Team. We know that life doesn’t always go smoothly, and it’s our job to support you through those times. The team offer a range of experience and knowledge, so please don’t be worried about talking to us. Our service is confidential, we can offer a listening ear or signpost you to other support. If you have any feedback about the service, please do get in touch!”

 

Picture of Miriam Nicholson Miriam Nicholson

Picture of Georgina Bromley

Georgina Bromley

Picture of Paula Douglas

Paula Douglas

Picture of Adrian Leech

Adrian Leech

Picture of Mel Hardy

Mel Hardy

Picture of Fran Bertram

Fran Bertram

Picture of Warren Evans

Warren Evans

Picture of Matty Evans

Matty Evans

Picture of Adam Granger

Adam Granger

Picture of Jake Hawker

Jake Hawker

read-matthew

Matthew Read

sanghera-parm

Parm Sanghera

Talk to Us

What times are the Wellbeing Service available?

The Wellbeing Service are typically available Monday – Friday, 9am-5pm GMT. We offer in person, zoom or telephone appointments and you can request an appointment via the following form:

Appointment Form

How can I contact the Wellbeing Service?

The Wellbeing Service can be accessed via email or via appointment. Click your school below to begin:

If you would like to provide feedback, please use our Feedback Form

 

Extensions and Extenuating Circumstances

Extenuating Circumstances and Extension Requests

The process for Extenuating Circumstances is to support students who have experienced unforeseen issues that have impacted their ability to engage with their studies and/or complete assessments. Students should notify us of any extenuating circumstances as soon as possible via the online form.

Students are encouraged to follow the guidance below:

  • Please read the Student Guidance on Extenuating Circumstances before completing the form: Access the Student Guidance Here
  • You should include all relevant information and sufficient detail about your circumstances and the impact this has had on your ability to study, meet deadlines, or take examinations.
  • You will be required to provide supporting evidence, please attach this to your EC request or email this to your Wellbeing Officer.
  • Requests for an extension should be made before the published deadline.
  • Extensions cannot be applied to online examinations.

If you require support from a Wellbeing Officer, please contact us at the most appropriate email address for you below.

You can find more information about the Code of Practice for Extenuating Circumstances here: Guidance Links to an external site.

Submit an Extension or Extenuating Circumstances Request  

You must request an extension before the deadline of your assessment.

We can approve extensions up to 15 days for assignments and 20 days for extended essays if you are able to provide supporting evidence. We are not able to provide extensions to work which you have already been granted an extension for.

When you have submitted your request, you will need to submit evidence in support of your request within 5 working days. Once we have received your request and evidence, we aim to process your request within 3 working days.

Disability and Reasonable Adjustments

Disability Support

If you have a disability, long term medical condition or any other medical issue that may impact your ability to study then you should inform a Wellbeing Officer as soon as possible. The Wellbeing Officer can inform your lecturers and seminar leaders, with your permission, and can provide further advice about who to contact within the University for further Assistances.

The University defines a disability as:

"a person has a disability if:
(a) they have a physical or mental impairment, and
(b) the impairment has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

the effect of an impairment is a long-term effect if:
(a) it has lasted at least 12 months;
(b) the period for which it lasts is likely to be at least 12 months; or
(c) it is likely to last for the rest of the life of the person affected."

You can find the code of practice on Reasonable Adjustments here.

The University defines a Reasonable Adjustment as:

A reasonable variation or alteration made to University processes so that a disabled student can access without disadvantage the higher educational opportunities of the institution without compromising the expected academic standards. Such reasonable adjustments could apply to:

(i) the process of admission to the University 
(ii) the delivery of teaching, consistent with the learning outcomes of a programme or module 
(iii) the examination and assessment process.

The Disability Service may suggest reasonable adjustments are made so that you are able to undertake your study most effectively. This can include adjustments such as additional equipment, automatic extensions, examination arrangements and advanced lecture notes (amongst others). This is referred to as a Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP).

To access the Disability Service you will need to complete the online form  and provide appropriate evidence, so they can ensure that any recommended adjustments are appropriate. Please attach your evidence to your registration form or email it to them separately.

If you have any queries about registering with the Disability Service, diagnostic testing for SpLDs or about your Reasonable Adjustment Plan, please contact the Student Disability Service at @disability@contacts.bham.ac.uk. 

Reasonable Adjustment and Resasonable Adjustment Plans

Reasonable Adjustments

The University defines a Reasonable Adjustment as:

A reasonable variation or alteration made to University processes so that a disabled student can access without disadvantage the higher educational opportunities of the institution, without compromising the expected academic standards. Such reasonable adjustments could apply to:

(i) the process of admission to the University 

(ii) the delivery of teaching, consistent with the learning outcomes of a programme or module 

(iii) the examination and assessment process.

The Disability and Learning Support service may suggest reasonable adjustments are made so that you are able to undertake your study most effectively. This can include adjustments such as additional equipment, automatic extensions, examination arrangements and advanced lecture notes (amongst others). This is referred to as a Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP).

The Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP) outlines the support and reasonable adjustments that are recommended for you. It provides information for your school and the wider university to ensure that your support requirements are considered.

If you feel your reasonable adjustment plan is not being implemented please speak to your welfare office or contact your key worker at student services to discuss your concerns. The College of Social Science follows a code of practice to ensure reasonable adjustments are implemented. For further information.

The Student Disability Service can arrange course/study related reasonable adjustments. and additional academic related support for both undergraduate and postgraduate students with a disability, including long-term mental or physical health conditions and autistic spectrum conditions.

Their services include:

  • Putting in place a Reasonable Adjustments Plan to inform the school of your requirements.
  • Arranging exam adjustments, for example, extra time or rest breaks.
  • Advice on applying for the Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) and support to set up DSA funded support.
  • Arranging non-DSA funded support such as non-specialist note-taking support.
  • Advice and guidance on screenings for students who think they might be dyslexic, dyspraxic or dyscalculic.

To speak with an adviser about what support and or adjustments you may need you need to register with our service  and provide medical evidence of your disability. 

For information about therapeutic support please visit our Mental Health and Wellbeing webpage.

Reasonable Adjustment Plans (RAP)

I have a diagnosed long term health condition and need support with my studies. What help can I get?

You may wish to apply for a Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP). Initially, you will need to register with the Disability Service. 

Once you have been issued with a RAP, the Wellbeing Office will invite you for regular reviews and ensure that your RAP is being implemented.

If you wish to apply for a RAP, you may wish to speak to the Wellbeing Officers first at one of our appointments or via email.

What is a Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP) and am I eligible?

The Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP) formerly known as a Student Support Advice (SSA) document outlines the support and reasonable adjustments that are recommended for you. It provides information for your school and the wider university to ensure that your support requirements are considered.

My RAP is not being implemented, what should I do?

If you feel your reasonable adjustment plan is not being implemented please speak to your wellbeing office or contact your key worker at student services to discuss your concerns. The College of Social Sciences follow a code of practice to ensure reasonable adjustments are implemented. 

I have a temporary injury, what disability support can I receive?

If you have a temporary injury which you need support, you may be eligible for Temporary Exam Adjustments.

You may wish to contact the Wellbeing Officer for your school via email or book an appointment via the online form.

Urgent and Non-Urgent Mental Health Support

Urgent mental health support

If you feel you need urgent support with your mental health, here is some useful advice:

In the first instance:

Alternatively you can:

  • Call 111 for free urgent care advice in situations that are not life-threatening.
  • Call Forward Thinking Birmingham is 24-hour crisis team on 0300 300 0099 (for people up to the age of 25). 
  • Call the Samaritans on 116 123. They operate a confidential, free to call service 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
  • Call SANEline a national out-of-hours mental health helpline offering specialist emotional support, guidance and information to anyone affected by mental illness.
  • Attend your local NHS walk-in service. The nearest walk-in service to the University is Katie Road, Selly Oak . Find your local NHS Walk in Service .
  • Call 999 or go to your local Accident & Emergency department (A&E). The nearest A&E to the University is at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham. Find your local A&E service.

For further information about seeking urgent support please visit Birmingham and Solihull’s Mental Health Trust’s webpage about what to do in an emergency .

Non-Crisis Mental Health Support

If you are concerned about your safety or the safety of others around you, please call 999 in the first instance.

The University has a wide range of support for your mental health of which Wellbeing Officers are just one part. Wellbeing Officers are your first port of call if you are finding things difficult. They offer a safe and confidential place to talk about feeling down, struggles with stress, anxiety or other struggles. Our Wellbeing Officers are trained to help and may signpost you on to some of the services listed below.

Personalised Support

Personalised support is run by our friendly and experienced team of psychological practitioners and counsellors, and will offer you a safe and confidential space in which to explore the difficulties you may be facing, and will help you develop effective strategies to overcome them. You don't need a mental health diagnosis from your doctor in order to access the service.

Personalised support comes in many different forms, but all will be tailored specifically to you to help you get the most out of your university experience. If you register for the service, your first session will always involve a one-to-one consultation, looking into your current challenges, and then deciding on the best course of support. This could involve;

  • One-to-one support with a psychological practitioner or counsellor
  • Referral onto an external service, including Forward Thinking Birmingham

All treatment is done with you at the forefront, working with you to find the best way to help and support you.

Details of their services are available here. 

You can register for personalised support here.

UBHeard

UBHeard is a confidential listening and support service for all registered students (undergraduate and postgraduate) that gives you immediate emotional and mental health support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.  

You will be able to speak to a mental health professional and counsellor who will guide you through any issues you may currently be facing – at University or at home. UBHeard offers immediate in-the-moment telephone support, and where appropriate, up to six sessions of counselling for mild-moderate issues.

Call the service now on 0800 368 5819 (Freephone UK*) or 00353 1 518 0277 (International), or visit the UBHeard portal 

Contact UBHeard via Live Chat by logging in to the UBHeard portal (you can easily create an account with your UoB email address). 

or

Text ‘Hi’ to 0035387 369 0010 for SMS & WhatsApp Support (standard rates apply)

The service is 100% confidential and free to use as a University of Birmingham Student. Counselling is delivered via telephone or video.

Pause

Pause - the collaboration between University mental health services, Forward Thinking Birmingham, and The Children's Society, are running drop in sessions on campus every Wednesday and Thursday, 11am-5pm. You can talk to the friendly team about anything that may be worrying you and they also lots of free activities throughout the year. You can find up to date information here.

Self-help guides

Self-help guides can be an excellent option for those concerned about their mental health. Our self-help guides have been written by clinical psychologists, and provide suggestions for simple ways in which you can begin to make positive changes, tailored to a wide variety of issues.

The guides are accessible, easy to use and relatively short (20-30 pages). Each guide is also available as an audiofile – you may find listening an easier way to access the materials, especially if you are finding it hard to concentrate on written materials.

Chaplains

You can access the Multi-Faith Chaplaincy at St Francis Hall which can be found next to the Guild of Students. Anyone wishing to speak to a Chaplain is recommended to contact the Chaplain they wish to speak to and provide a phone number so that they can call you back.

If you are unsure who to contact, or want to find out more about the Multi-Faith Chaplaincy, please contact the Chaplaincy Administrator.

Support from the Guild 

The Guild Advice team and Student Mentors are available by email to offer advice and support, you can contact the Guild Advice team at guildadvice@guild.bham.ac.uk and the Student Mentors team at mentorwelfare@guild.bham.ac.uk.

Mindfulness 

Mindfulness

Feeling stressed? Mind overrun with thoughts? CoSS Wellbeing are pleased to offer live online Mindfulness sessions to help you cope with the challenges of university life, and restore a sense of calm.

You can join our CoSS Calm Club for weekly sessions via zoom every Wednesday at 3pm, where we'll be using mindfulness to learn what to do when procrastination sets in, cope with change and begin to turn stress into success. 

To sign up for sessions or for more information about our CoSS Mindfulness events, click here.

If you have any questions or would like to find out more information you can also email us directly at coss.mindfulness@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Frequently Asked Questions

General 

What happens when I see a Wellbeing Officer? Is it confidential?

If you book through our appointment system, you will be allocated a Wellbeing Officer and be given appointment details. Appointments are 20mins. Any notes made are completely confidential. They do not have any impact on your academic record, and are not disclosed unless you are at risk of harm to yourself or others.

You can read more about our Confidentiality Policy here.

Where can I update my student details?

You can change your student details you can do this on the intranet page for managing your personal data.

How can I access computer clusters remotely?

Students can now access computer clusters remotely from their own devices. From Wednesday 7 October, students are able to remotely log in to computers across campus, using the new Remote Computer Access service. Students can securely access all the same hardware and software that they would do on campus, on their own devices – addressing digital poverty, and enabling students to work from home just as effectively as on campus. Teaching staff can also use Remote Computer Access.
Find out more.

I have a question regarding my module, who can I speak to?

You can email your lecturer directly with any questions you have regarding your module.

If you have a question in relation to when your assessments are taking place, you may find it helpful to contact your Education Support Team.

Where can I get access to impartial advice on student issues such as accommodation?

The university Guild of Students provides independent support for students including an Advice service.

I'm an international student and have questions about my Visa, who should I ask?

The university offers several services of particular interest to international students.

Financial Support

I'm having financial difficulties. What extra help can I get?

Statutory support  is offered for a number of student groups through the gov.uk website

Postgraduate Student funding  can be secured from Research council funding, the Graduate School can be contacted for further information.

Access Awards & Widening Participation

The Chamberlain Award  offers additional financial support to qualifying students, information about who is eligible and how it is awarded can be found here.

Prospective applicants can receive the support of the  Universities A2B scheme   if they are studying at one of our partner institutions.

University Scholarships & Bursaries

The University undergraduate funding database contains details of undergraduate  funding opportunities available to support studies at the University of Birmingham.

The University postgraduate funding database contains details of postgraduate  taught and research scholarship and funding opportunities available to support studies at the University of Birmingham.

Alternative Funding

The Alternative Guide (AGO)   is a web resource for current and prospective postgraduate students (any subject, any nationality) who are looking to fund PhD, Masters, and PGCE study in the UK through grants from charities, trusts, and foundations.

Professional and Career Development Loans  are bank loans between £300 and £10,000 to pay for courses and training that help with career development or getting into work.

I am experiencing financial hardship. Where can I go for support?

The Student Support Fund (SSF) is provided by the University to help students who have genuine and unavoidable financial difficulties and are struggling with their living costs despite having received all financial support available to them.

Trussell Trust  runs food banks that supply a food parcel that will support you for at least 3 days . A referral is needed to access a food bank and information about how to gain a referral can be found on Citizens Advice. 

I want to budget for the academic year. Where can I find estimates of costs?

Practical Budget Management

Living Costs that should be budgeted in the first year at University of Birmingham are broken down on this internal web page

The Guild.  offer advice about costs associated with university and ways to support yourself and save money.

1:1 Advice & Support

Student Help   has a ‘Fees and Financial Support’ section with FAQs and knowledge base articles as well as a contact section that you can direct further queries to.

Guild Advice  offers free, impartial and confidential advice service for students including one to one support, open 10–4pm during term time, with Advisors on hand between 12 and 2pm.

Where can I find a simple spreadsheet for my monthly budget?

We have created a simple spreadsheet for you to use to calculate your spending for the weeks, months and year ahead.

Academic Support

I need some support with Academic Skills such as essay writing and referencing. Where can I get support?

The Academic Skills Centre

The Academic Skills Centre are able to support you with all aspects of developing your academic skills. You may wish to book an online one to one appointment, attend a workshop, or access their online resources.

If you would like to talk to someone about getting assistance with your academic work then please follow this link for an overview of the services that the University provides:

https://intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/as/studentservices/projects/support/study-skills-and-support.aspx Links to an external site.

Your Personal Tutor will also be able to provide advice on this.

Extensions and Extenuating Circumstances

I need to defer my exams. What can I do?

After your exam timetable is released, you have 10 working days to defer your exams if you are aware of circumstances which would affect your ability to attend the exam.

If Extenuating Circumstances mean that you are unable to attend an exam, you can submit a request up to 24 hours after your final exam, and by the final deadline published by the Wellbeing Team.

You can request a deferral here.

When you have submitted your request, you will need to submit evidence in support of your request within 5 working days. Once we have received your request and evidence, we aim to process your request within 7 working days. We cannot process a request without evidence.

I was unwell on the morning of my exam and couldn’t attend. What can I do?

If Extenuating Circumstances mean that you are unable to attend an exam, you can submit a request up to 24 hours after your final exam, and by the final deadline published on Canvas.

You can request a deferral here.

When you have submitted your request, you will need to submit evidence in support of your request within 5 working days. Once we have received your request and evidence, we aim to process your request within 7 working days. We cannot process a request without evidence.

I feel my performance in my exam has been impacted due to reasons that are out of my control. What can I do?

If circumstances beyond your control have impacted your performance during an exam, you can submit an Extenuating Circumstances request for a further opportunity to sit the exam.

You can submit a request up to 24 hours after your final exam, and by the final deadline published on Canvas. You can request a further first sit here.

When you have submitted your request, you will need to submit evidence in support of your request within 5 working days. Your request will be presented to EC Panel who will make a decision about your request.

You will be notified of the outcome of your request once EC Panel has taken place.

What evidence do I need to provide in support of my Extension/EC request?

Evidence should be provided on letterheaded paper and from an independent third party. It must be genuine, dated, and written in English. If your evidence is not in English, you will need to pay for it to be translated. Further information can be found in the student guidance.

A letter from your GP should be on letterheaded paper, dated, signed and stamped. It should include details of what is impacting you, how long it has affected you for and how long the impact is likely to last. You may also provide hospital letters including consultant and A&E discharge papers.

We are unable to accept appointment cards.

We would also recommend using the University Medical CertificateLinks to an external site.; a medical professional can complete Part D. 

I haven’t had a response to my Extension/EC request. What should I do?

We do advise that at busy periods it may take longer to process Extension and EC requests. If we approve your Extension request after your assignment deadline, late penalties will not be applied. If we are presenting your EC to EC Panel, you will not receive an outcome until EC Panel has taken place after the end of the exam period.

What happens if the EC panel reject my application?

As per the university’s code of practice governing academic appeals, you may appeal on either or both of the following grounds: There were circumstances unknown to the Board of Examiners that affected your academic performance and you can present good reason for these circumstances not being made known prior to the meeting of the Board of Examiners. ii. There was an administrative irregularity or failure in procedure giving rise to a reasonable doubt as to whether the progress decision would have been different if it had not occurred.

If you would like to submit an Academic Appeal, you should first read the Code of Practice on Academic Appeals Procedures. In particular you should pay careful attention to Section 4.3 'Grounds for Appeal'. You will then need to complete a submission form, paying careful attention to the guidance notes.

Academic Appeals

Authorised Leave and Leave of Absence

You may find the FAQ document for Academic Appeals useful too.

I’m going to be away from the university during term time, what should I do?

In most cases, email us or and speak to us through our appointment slots or get in contact with your personal tutor to discuss why you need time away and how long you think you will need too.

If you are an international student your absence must be approved by the University, and you must complete the Authorised Absence Form. If you stop attending your course without approval this could have a negative impact on your student visa. For more information, please visit https://intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/as/registry/studentrecords/services/authorised-absence-international-students.aspx

I need to take time off from my studies. Who can I talk to about this?

If you are considering temporarily withdrawing from the University, you will need to discuss this matter with your tutor / supervisor in your School. It is also advisable to also email the Schools Wellbeing Officers to inform them of your circumstances.

Code of Practice   on Leave of Absence procedures’  and guidance for taught students 

Leave of Absence   – Information about taking a leave of absence and what students need to do when they return, for undergraduate and postgraduate (taught) students.

I don’t think I can continue my studies this academic year, what are my options?

At the University you can temporarily withdraw from your studies, giving you a period of time where you are not student. In all cases, we would advise that you come and speak to a Welfare Officer or your personal tutor about why you would like to take time out of your studies, and whether it’s a viable option for you. For more information, please visit https://intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/as/registry/studentrecords/services/leave-of-absence.aspx

I want to return to the University from a Leave of Absence. How do I go about this?

You can find the details and the return from Leave of Absence form

I’m thinking of withdrawing from my course. Who can I speak to about this?

If you are considering withdrawing permanently from the university, you are strongly advised to meet with your Personal Tutor for advice and guidance before making a final decision.  If you are wanting to withdraw due to reasons which are having an impact on your wellbeing please attend one of our Wellbeing appointments to speak to a Wellbeing officer as we may be able to offer you further support and discuss alternative options.

Permanent Withdrawal   - Information for students about what to do if they wish to voluntarily withdraw from the university, for undergraduate and postgraduate (taught) students.

Mental Health

I think a friend may be struggling with their mental or emotional health. What should I do?

Encourage your friend to seek support from the University Mental Health & Wellbeing service. Encourage them to see the Wellbeing Officer in their school for further support.

I am having suicidal thoughts and require urgent help. Who can help me?

The following organisations can support you if you are experiencing suicidal thoughts:

Samaritans – Call 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org
Papyrus Hopeline – Call 0800 068 4141 or email pat@papyrus-uk.org
Call your GP and ask for an emergency appointment
Out of hours call NHS 111

If you have harmed yourself and your life is in danger, call 999 or go to A&E. 

Where can I see a doctor?

The three GP practices that are closest to the university are the  University Medical Practice,  Bournbrook Varsity Medical Centre and  University Southgate Practice . There is also a search engine on the NHS website which enables you to locate your  nearest GP surgery

If you are unable to obtain an appointment at your GP surgery and wish to see a GP, the closest  GP Walk-In Centre to the university is on Katie Road in Selly Oak.

Please contact the NHS 111 team out of normal practice hours, in the first instance, and only call an ambulance or go to your local Accident and Emergency department if it's been deemed necessary to by the NHS 111 team or for one of the reasons, constituting an emergency, as outlined on this  NHS Web Page 

Someone close to me has died. What support can I get?

Cruse offer Bereavement Support.  however, you may wish to discuss your bereavement with a Wellbeing Officer who will be able to signpost to specific services and offer support with Extensions and ECs.

I’m homesick and I don’t know what to do

Coming to University is a big change, and everyone adapts differently in those first months. There are a number of student groups you can join through the Guild of Students that will help you build a network of friends as well as those you may meet in accommodation or on your course.

Make sure you keep in touch with home too. If you need additional support, you may wish to speak to a Wellbeing Officer at one of our Drop-In sessions.

I need help from the emergency services. What should I do?

If you need to contact the emergency services (Police, Ambulance or Fire Service) please dial 999 and ask for the relevant service. This could be an incident such as a crime, serious physical or mental ill health or a fire. If an incident like this occurs on campus please contact the University Security Services (0121 414 4444) as well as dialling 999.

I need urgent mental health support. What should I do?

Urgent mental health support

If you feel you need urgent support with your mental health, here is some useful advice:

  • In the first instance: If you have a GP, please contact them and ask for an emergency appointment. If they are not open they should have an out-of-hours number you can call.
  • If you do not have a GP, please call the switchboard for Birmingham and Solihull’s Mental Health Trust on 0121 301 0000.

Always call 999 if someone is seriously ill or injured, and their life is at risk.

For further information about seeking urgent support please visit Birmingham and Solihull’s Mental Health Trust’s webpage about what to do in an emergency.

Reporting Incidents

I’ve been a victim of crime. What support can I access?

If you have been a victim of crime we would strongly encourage you to report it to the police and to Security if it took place on campus.

University of Birmingham  Security Services operate 24 hours a day all year round and are always available to offer assistance and advice to Students, Staff and members of the public.
The role of Security Services is to provide a secure campus environment by protecting people, property and safeguarding the University's reputation as a safe place to live, work and study.

The services they provide include: advice on personal safety and crime prevention, help and assistance during an incident and liaison with the police and other emergency services.

Security Control (non-emergencies) 0121 414 3000  (43000  if dialling internally)
Security Control (emergencies)  0121 414 4444  (44444 internally)

Students and staff can visit the Crime Prevention Hub in University Centre for information/advice

Where can I find victim support?

Victim Support is an independent charity in England and Wales that provides specialist practical and emotional support to victims and witnesses of crime.

Suzy Lamplugh Trust  0808 802 0300 (Advice for victims). Provides personal safety tips and information.

If you are having a crisis or are concerned for the safety of someone else, please read the information below on how to get help.

University Security

The University Security Services work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days of the year. You can call them on 0121 414 4444. They can provide assistance in an emergency and they can also help in urgent but non-life threatening situations. In case of an emergency always dial 999 first.

University Security Services can:

  • Provide first aid on campus.
  • Attend on campus if there are suspicious persons or behaviour, to challenge and investigate the situation. 
  • Provide assistance if you feel vulnerable or unsafe on campus. For example, if you think you are being followed. 

Contacting the emergency services

If you need to contact the emergency services (Police, Ambulance or Fire Service) please dial 999 and ask for the relevant service.

Examples of why you may need to contact the emergency services:

  • Witness or victim to a crime in progress requiring the police to attend.  
  • Witness or victim to a serious injury requiring an ambulance.
  • Witness or victim to a fire requiring the fire service to attend.

If an incident like this occurs on campus please contact the University Security Services (0121 414 4444) as well as dialling 999. Security will assist with such incidents, such as applying temporary first aid, deterring an offender or providing support. They will also liaise with the emergency services to ensure they can access campus as quickly as possible.

More information

Colleges

Professional Services